words words words words
  • Welcome to my library. This is where I spend my days expanding my vast wisdom, honing my keen wit, and editing my Dental Gazette.

    For my Autobiography, my Daily Words of Wit and Wisdom, my Dental Gazette, and the TLC Dental Home Page please open the books on my desk.

  • For your edification and pleasure I have written a very abridged version of My Autobiography that you may read below.

  • Weary of being badgered by Bartlett, Mencken, and countless Oxford Dons to share my unsurpassed collection of quotes and my personal words of wit and wisdom with the hoi polloi, I shall post them below as daily delights.

  • Inspired by the likes of William Randolph Hearst and Lord Beaverbrook, I have founded a definitive Dental Gazette devoted to providing "all the dental news fit to print" or more properly a digital version thereof. The current edition is below.

Wisdom Teeth Wisdom Teeth
Wisdom Teeth Wisdom Teeth Wisdom Teeth
The Wisdom Tooth TLC Dental Group Syracuse NY
"Welcome to my library. This is where I spend my days expanding my vast wisdom, honing my keen wit, and editing my Dental Gazette.

For my Autobiography, my Daily Words of Wit and Wisdom, my Dental Gazette, and the TLC Dental Home Page, please open the books on top."
"For your edification and pleasure I have written a very abridged version of My Autobiography that you may read below."
"Weary of being badgered by Bartlett, Mencken, and countless Oxford Dons to share my unsurpassed collection of quotes and my personal words of wit and wisdom with the hoi polloi, I shall post them below as daily delights."
"Inspired by the likes of William Randolph Hearst and Lord Beaverbrook, I have founded a definitive Dental Gazette devoted to providing "all the dental news fit to print" or more properly a digital version thereof. The current edition is below."
*Google Maps places the Wisdom Tooth's library in the TLC Dental Group building in Fayetteville, New York.

My Autobiography

Although I am well known for my late arrivals, I should explain that I am more than a near no-show. My very name, deriving from the Latin dens sepientiae, harks back to Roman times. I not only know Latin and its classical brethren but also 6,909 spoken languages. I hold a vast reserve of knowledge garnered over the many centuries since my inception. And this immense trove of wisdom is stored in the nanostructure of my enamel that particle physicists have yet to bounce around the Hadron Collider to garner the next Nobel prize.

Indeed, my vital place in the human body and particularly my relationship to the brain is little appreciated. It is known that I and my kindred teeth, who lack my unique well of wisdom, have trigeminal nerves connecting to the brain whose insular and cingulate regions get very agitated when we send up pain signals.

What is not known is that I have direct pipelines to the frontal cortex and hippocamus regions of the brain that are its memory. They think I'm a Saudi oil well, an immense reserve, in this instance of knowledge and information, upon which they endlessly draw.

All that I impart to you is unknown by the current lot of bumbling researchers. If you google, bing, or yahoo wisdom tooth pipeline to the brain you won't find anything except useless ads for oral surgeons, a loathsome subset of dentistry. When the luminaries on the Charlie Rose Brain Series periodically gather to discuss their recent insights, am I ever mentioned? Of course not.

To be sure, I am largely responsible for my obscurity. I tend to keep a low profile. In fact, 36% of the time, I don't even join my fellow teeth. But there is a reason for my shyness. He's called an oral surgeon. You'd keep a low profile too if some wretch constantly tried to yank you. Thankfully, in the midst of his depredations I find comfort in knowning that other luminaries such as Galileo, Copernicus, and Descartes were persecuted for their knowledge.

I also find comfort in my library at the Rothenberg DDS/TLC Dental Group office in Fayetteville, New York. It consumes a wide swath of the building's lower level and was generously constructed for me by Dr. Rothenberg and his wife Marsha. It is testimony to Dr. Rothenberg's big heart (he is often called "the gentle giant" by his legions of loyal patients) and, as a founder of TLC Dental Group and author of The Dental Dictionary, to his fervent advocacy of knowledge.

Even though she is much smaller than Dr. Rothenberg, Marsha too has a big heart. She is the Manager of TLC Dental Group and as a co-founder of The Green Dental Society, a wonderful organization that promotes eco-friendly practices in the dental profession, she is no less an advocate of knowledge.

Dr. Rothenberg and Marsha, knowledge mavens in the manner of the late William Safire, felt that I need a library in which to cultivate my wisdom and edit my Dental Gazette. They were most insightful for if I did not continually expand my knowledge I would simply become another talk show twit.

So I write to you now from the quiet of my library, tending to my daily words of wit and wisdom and my Dental Gazette, lulled by strains of Bach on Spotify, and occasionally nuzzled by Flossy, a lovely labrador who is the most beloved member of the TLC staff.

Vivat scientia,
The Wisdom Tooth

My Compedium of Quotes

This collection of quotes derives from sundry sources: some contemporary, some ancient, and some personal. Despite their diverse origins and nature, they share a pithy expression of the human condition that I trust will resonate in their reading.

“Smile and the whole world smiles with you.”

--Louis Armstrong

“Beauty, health, and happiness reside in your smile.”

--Estée Lauder

“A smile speaks success and confidence.”

--Andrew Carnegie

“A smile is the most important thing you wear.”

--Yves Saint-Laurent

“A smile is a universal welcome.”

--Emily Post

Dental Gazette TLC Dental Group Syracuse NY
Dental Gazette TLC Dental Group Syracuse NY

Posted in Population Health

It turns out the scariest part of Halloween may not be the ghosts and goblins, but microscopic bacteria that causes cavities—not to mention the dental health habits of the U.S. population.

Halloween is fun for families, but certain types of candy combined with poor dental care habits can really be frightening. It’s always good to think about oral health, but Halloween is an especially important time since so many will indulge in sweet treats.

For example, we looked at data for more than ten million dental plan enrollees and found that:

  • More than 1 in 3 failed to see a dentist in 2013
  • Nearly 25% hadn’t seen a dentist or taken advantage of covered preventive services in 2 years
  • Nearly 20% had a cavity filled in 2013
    The post-Halloween season is the perfect time to receive a checkup as indulging in sugary foods metabolizes sugar and produces acids that quickly eat away at tooth enamel if not removed.
    To reduce the risk, we suggest that people:
  • Enjoy sugary foods in moderation
  • Avoid sticky candies like taffy or treats as well as hard candies that stay in the mouth a long time—instead, choose candies that quickly dissolve and can be eaten easily like chocolate
  • Brush after eating and CALL US or VISIT US ON THE WEB for your TLC DENTAL examination and dental cleaning.

(315) 637-7684 TLCDENTALSYR.com